Monday, February 1, 2010

White House Says Badly Injured Victims Are Being Identified for Transfer to Florida and ElsewherePrinted in The Wall Street Journal, page A8


Charlie Christ, gobernor of Florida, USA.
FEBRUARY 1, 2010.U.S. to Resume Haitian Evacuations


Mr. Vietor, the White House spokesman, said in a Saturday interview, "Funding is not the problem."

He said the suspension had been caused by logistical problems, such as locating large and sophisticated medical facilities close to airports that can handle big military transport planes, such as C-130s. He added that other logistical concerns include having "the right medical facilities on the plane itself, and medical facilities prearranged when you land."

bái gōng biǎo shì, shòu zhòng shāng de shāng yuán zhèng zài què dìng zhuǎn yí dào fó luó lǐ dá zhōu hé qí tā dì fāng

fēi tuō ěr xiān shēng, bái gōng fā yán rén shuō, zài zhōu liù jiē shòu cǎi fǎng shí,“zī jīn bù shì wèn tí。”
tā shuō, zàn tíng yǐ zào chéng hòu qín wèn tí, rú zhǎo dào dà xíng hé xiān jìn de yī liáo shè shī, yǐ jī chǎng, kě qǐ jiàng dà xíng jūn yòng yùn shū jī de jì huà, rúC - 130yùn shū jī。tā bǔ chōng shuō, qí tā hòu qín wèn tí, bāo kuò yǒu“shì dàng de yī liáo shè shī, shàng le fēi jī běn shēn, yī liáo shè shī de tǔ dì shí, yù xiān ān pái de。”

La Casa Blanca dice que las víctimas mal heridas están siendo identificados para su traslado a Florida y otros lugares

El Sr. Vietor, el portavoz de la Casa Blanca, dijo en una entrevista del sábado, "La financiación no es el problema".
Dijo que la suspensión había sido causado por problemas logísticos, como la localización de los centros médicos grandes y sofisticados cerca de los aeropuertos que pueden manejar grandes aviones de transporte militar, como el C-130. Agregó que otros problemas de logística que incluyen "las instalaciones de derecho médico en el avión en sí, y las instalaciones médicas preestablecido cuando llegan a  tierra".
La declaración de la Casa Blanca el domingo también citó "preocupaciones por la presión en la capacidad nacional de salud".
NOTA DEL BLOGGER PARA ESTA INFORMACION:
( Hay falta de enfermeros, medicos e infraestrucutura hospitalaria en Estados Unidos, mas problemas logisticos aunque los recursos y el dinero son mas que abundantes, esta es una nota "ad hoc" del blogger que vive en Sarasota, Florida y padece el problema interno de salud hace anos, es absolutamente cierto lo que alega La Casa Blanca, no hay doble moral en el problema haitiano bajo la administracion de Obama, ni en el gobernador Charlie Christ de Florida, todo lo contrario, estan trabajando incesantemente sobre Haiti. Gualterio Nunez Estrada, Sarasota, Florida, 34232.)


Haiti Earthquake

The White House statement on Sunday also cited "concerns about the strain on domestic health capacity."


White House Says Badly Injured Victims Are Being Identified for Transfer to Florida and Elsewhere.

By DAVID GAUTHIER-VILLARS, BETSY MCKAY And JENNIFER LEVITZ

PORT-AU-PRINCE—Five days after suspending medical evacuations of critically ill Haitian earthquake victims, the U.S. government said Sunday evening that it planned to resume them "in the next 12 hours."
"Patients are being identified for transfer, doctors are making sure that it is safe for them to fly, and we are preparing specific in-flight pediatric care aboard the aircraft where needed," said White House spokesman Tommy Vietor in a statement.
He said that Florida is identifying facilities to receive the patients and that some evacuees might be sent to other countries.
Why the evacuations were suspended is unclear as various government authorities have provided different explanations.
Despite a massive effort by the U.S. military and other agencies, medical facilities in Haiti remain strained.
"Since the earthquake, U.S. personnel have seen nearly 23,000 patients in Haiti," according to the White House statement.
On Thursday, Gen. Douglas Fraser, the head of the military's Southern Command, said the hospital ship USNS Comfort, which arrived off Port-au-Prince on Jan. 19, is effectively no longer capable of treating new patients because many of the injured brought to the ship are badly hurt and need longer hospitalizations than first thought.
The general said the U.S. is working to build a large new medical facility on an empty tract donated by the Haitian government. The 40-acre facility, made up mostly of tents, will have as many as 5,000 beds, almost 10 times as many as are available on the Comfort.
Dr. Arthur Fournier, interim director of University of Miami's hospital in Haiti, said Sunday evening that seriously injured patients, including children, were in danger of dying if they weren't airlifted soon to sophisticated hospitals.
His medical team had "a child with a severe head trauma," he said. Another patient, a 13-year-old girl, had pneumonia and had suffered two respiratory arrests in which her lungs stopped working. "She needs to get out soon to save her life," Dr. Fournier said.
"Imagine the frustration of our workers," he said, "to have brought her back to life and to know that she has a chance, but to be told that she can't be taken to where she ought to be taken because of government bureaucracy."
Another Haitian patient awaiting evacuation, Edwin Pierrot, broke both legs in the temblor. On Sunday afternoon, his infected legs had swollen to three times their normal size.
His doctors, who said he was at risk of gangrene, had been liaising with U.S. authorities to evacuate him, but so far to no avail. Mr. Pierrot is a Haitian citizen with a U.S. residency permit and an American wife.
"Every day, I am told that I will be evacuated tomorrow," Mr. Pierrot said in a weak voice as a nurse hung a fresh pack of rhesus negative blood on a bedside hook. "But every day, I am bumped from one hospital to another."
The U.S. military said originally that it had suspended the medical evacuations on Jan. 27 because of an apparent federal-state dispute over who would pay for their care.
"The question came, 'Who is paying for the medical treatments?' " Capt. Kevin Aandahl, a spokesman with the U.S. Transportation Command, an arm of the military, said Saturday.
But Mr. Vietor, the White House spokesman, said in a Saturday interview, "Funding is not the problem."
He said the suspension had been caused by logistical problems, such as locating large and sophisticated medical facilities close to airports that can handle big military transport planes, such as C-130s. He added that other logistical concerns include having "the right medical facilities on the plane itself, and medical facilities prearranged when you land."Haiti Earthquake
The White House statement on Sunday also cited "concerns about the strain on domestic health capacity."
That jibed with one of the issues raised by the government of Florida, where most of the medical evacuees have landed–526 of them as of Jan. 29, according to state authorities. Officials there had cited limited capacity and raised the issue of who would pay for the victims' treatment. Because of the severity of the injuries and the number of victims, the cost of care could run into the many millions of dollars.
Florida Gov. Charlie Crist said in a statement Saturday, "Let me be clear—at no time has Florida closed our doors to those impacted by the earthquake in Haiti." APTOPIX Haiti Earthquake
The governor also told ABC News's Good Morning America Sunday that 700 people had been flown to Florida over the previous two days. Few had serious injuries. Three—all U.S. citizens—were admitted to an Orlando hospital, the governor's spokesman said.
Still, in a letter Tuesday to federal Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, Gov. Crist had stated that Florida's health-care system "is quickly reaching saturation."
He asked Ms. Sebelius to activate the National Disaster Medical System, which is typically used in domestic disasters and pays for victims' care. Haiti Earthquake
He wrote that the system was needed to help distribute patients to other states and "ensure states are appropriately reimbursed for their services."
A spokeswoman for HHS said that questions of funding hadn't caused the halt in evacuations.
The suspension of evacuations was first reported in The New York Times on Friday.
—Yochi Dreazen in Washington, Gina Chon in Port-au-Prince and Mark Schoofs in New York contributed to this article.
Printed in The Wall Street Journal, page A8
Copyright 2009 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved
US Military to Resume Haiti Evacuation Flights



Monday, February 1, 2010


By: Tom Parkinson
The White House says the U.S. military will resume bringing Haitian earthquake victims to the United States for medical treatment, ending a suspension that lasted several days. The military had flown hundreds of injured Haitians to the United States before halting the flights last Wednesday. Military officials said they stopped the evacuation flights after some states refused to take patients. Governor Charlie Crist told ABC's "Good Morning America" on Sunday that no Florida hospital has turned away patients. Crist said federal officials have promised that Florida would get help to cover medical costs for earthquake survivors. On Sunday, a White House spokesman said that the military flights were on track to resume Monday, and patients were being identified for the flights



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