Monday, May 17, 2010

Zahra Boudkou:rReleased from prison the youngest political prisoner in Morocco

The País.com (Spain) - 8 hours ago

... Saturday to Sunday in celebration to welcome Boudkour Zahra described by the independent press in Morocco as the youngest political prisoner in the country

Saturday, May 15, 2010

CUBA: "Green economy", "eco-friendly", for one million hectares.


"Food sovereignty has become a national security issue for Cuba and, therefore, a priority in the updated economic model currently being implemented." Not by chance is in the agricultural sector which are taking place some of the most significant structural changes in recent years.
It is a concept("green economy") that tries to dominate in more than one million hectares of idle lands that have been delivered as usufruct, in thousands of smallholder farms, on parcels of urban neighborhoods and small towns, and within yards the cities themselves, without shame, of course, the potential offered by the basic units of cooperative production (UBPC), state farms and other productive organizations.
(This is from an interview to the owner of a cuban "ecofriendly farm published by "Juventud Rebelde"-see link, in spanish, click here):
http://www.juventudrebelde.cu/cuba/2010-05-14/luz-del-viento-en-la-finca-de-rafael-rosales-/#comment)

- What principles and technologies used? La soberanía alimentaria se ha convertido en un asunto de seguridad nacional para Cuba y, por tanto, en una de las prioridades en la actualización del modelo económico que actualmente se implementa. No por casualidad es en el sector agrícola donde están teniendo lugar algunas de las transformaciones estructurales más relevantes de los últimos años.




"The recovery, preservation and improvement of soils, integrated pest and diseases, not to apply chemicals, contour planting and from the slopes, living and dead lift barriers, not burning crop residues, applying organic matter, humus, insert and associated crops, syrup, and the optimal use of water, rain water harvesting, pollination with bees ... The list is long. All yields flattering, friendly nature and that saves energy and money.


- What technologies have been developed own on his farm?

"We produce vermicompost, organic fertilizers and also our seeds: we have been determining what are the most resistant varieties to pests and diseases and better adapted to our conditions. Elaborate further our own bio-stimulant, natural product-the RAFLIN 2002 - recognized by the Forum of Science and Technology, and now we are preparing the record we have developed a methodology for growing roses triples and has a big harvest environmental impact, to dispense with the guardians, ie the rods to tie the plants, because more than half a million of these (one hectare requires thousands) mean about one hectare of forest to be cut or plantations that are to plant and then harvest.

-Institutional and state support:
"I must add also that in all this effort we are not alone, we have the advice of the Center for Reproduction of Entomopathogenic Entomophages and municipal Seed Company, Station Provincial de Investigaciones de la Caña de Azúcar, the Cuban Association of Agricultural Technicians and Forestry and other institutions, including the Antonio Núñez Jiménez Foundation for Nature and Man. "


Es un concepto("sistemas agroecologicos" o de "economia verde") que se intenta predomine en más de un millón de hectáreas de tierras ociosas que se han entregado en calidad de usufructo, en miles de fincas de pequeños agricultores, en parcelas de las periferias urbanas y pequeñas ciudades, y dentro de los patios de las urbes mismas, sin desdorar, por supuesto, las potencialidades que ofrecen las unidades básicas de producción cooperativa (UBPC), las granjas estatales y otras organizaciones productivas

Friday, May 14, 2010

Cuba:Two Cubans in the world top list of vaccines producers.

HAVANA, Cuba, May 13 (acn) Two Cuban experts have been included in a select group of top level industrial vaccine producers.
HAVANA, Cuba, May 13 (acn) Two Cuban experts have been included in a select group of top level industrial vaccine producers.
According to Granma newspaper, doctors Luis Herrera Martinez, General Director of the Havana-based Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB), and Gerardo Guillen Nieto, head of the Biomedical Research Department at this prestigious institution, have been included in a list of 18 global top industry experts.
Sources from the Cuban Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment said the list has just been published in the context of preparations for the Fourth World Vaccine Congress Asia 2010, scheduled for June 8-11 in Singapore.
The two Cuban experts are the only ones in the list from an underdeveloped country. All the others come from highly developed nations such as Germany, the United Kingdom, Switzerland, the United States, Sweden, Denmark, Italy, Australia, Canada, Austria and Belgium.
Source: ACN
Read more: http://www.cubaheadlines.com/2010/05/14/21595/two_cuban_experts_among_world%E2%80%99s_top_vaccine_producers.html#ixzz0nu8q2jWn


Original article here!

Two Cuban Experts among World’s Top Vaccine Producers

Two Cuban Experts among World’s Top Vaccine Producers

Posted using ShareThis

Live report about Florida beaches in one click everywhere you are, here.


Copy and paste or click here: http://www.mote.org/index.php?src=gendocs&ref=beach%20conditions%20reports&category=Main

As of May 10, 2010, there have been no reports of oil on any of Florida's beaches.

The Beach Conditions Report™ covers 33 beaches along Florida's Gulf Coast from the Panhandle south to Collier County. Reports, provided by specially trained observers, are updated twice daily at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. 365 days a year. Each report is time stamped so that the public knows when it was last updated.
Reports are provided by lifeguards, parks personnel and beach patrol officers who use PDAs to upload information directly to the web via special interface designed by Mote. Click here for the Reports or to sign up to receive reports about particular beaches via e-mail. You may also call 941-BEACHES to listen to Reports over the phone.

Florida beaches included in the Beach Conditions Report™ are:

Escambia County: Pensacola Beach

Okaloosa County: Fort Walton Beach, Henderson Beach State Park and Destin Beach

Gulf County: St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, both Gulfside and Bayside

Franklin County: St. George Island State Park, both Bayside and Gulfside

Pinellas County: Caladesi Island, Fort DeSoto Park

Manatee County: Manatee Beach, Coquina Beach

Sarasota County: Lido Key, Siesta Key, Nokomis, Venice North Jetty, Venice Beach, Manasota Beach

Lee County: Bowditch Point Park, Lynn Hall Beach Park, Lovers Key State Park, Bonita Beach, Tarpon Bay Beach, Lighthouse Point, Newton Park and Little Estero Island/Holiday Inn

Collier County: Barefoot Beach, Vanderbilt Beach, Seagate Beach, Lowdermilk Park, Naples Pier, Tigertail Beach, South Marco Beach

Thursday, May 13, 2010

BP and Transocean continue talks on Capitol Hill, Posted: May 13, 2010 4:40 AM EDT

 

WASHINGTON (ABC)-- A new containment device could be in place and ready to go Thursday night, to capture and siphon off that spewing oil in the Gulf of Mexico. It's not even capped yet, and the energy policy fallout from the leak extends from coast to coast. Thursday a half dozen West Coast Senate Democrats will propose legislation to permanently prohibit offshore drilling on the outer continental shelf of California, Oregon, and Washington State.

Photo taken with Olympus SP-565UZ by the blog author.
BP has reluctantly released video footage, at the request of the White House and Congress, showing the spill as it's happening. The geyser is a mix of black oil and lighter natural gas spewing from the ocean floor, a mile below the surface.
This device, a five story-high blowout preventer, is supposed to cut off the oil in an accident. Congressional investigators now say BP's internal documents show it was broken.
Representative Henry Waxman, a Democrat from California says, "That the device had a leak in a crucial hydraulic system and a defectively configured ram."
BP and the manufacturer, Transocean, who made the device, are blaming each other.Transocean CEO and President Steven Newman says, "The ineffectiveness of the B-O-P to control the flow is not the root cause of the event."
BP is scrambling to stop the leak. Their latest plan: the Top Hat. It was lowered to the ocean floor, designed to capture the escaping oil and siphon it to a ship on the surface.
Chairman and BP America President Lamar McKay says, "We're doing everything we can."As the hearing went on, more wildlife and tarballs washed on shore, possible victims of the spill. Congress is already considering tighter restrictions on the oil industry.
Senator Waxman says, "Our national energy policy is broken."
BP says it will pay any legitimate claim of damages for the spill, despite a federal cap of $75 million. Still, the White House has asked lawmakers to raise that limit.
Online Reporter: Jill Courtney

Last monday in a Sarasota beach with our dears friends and community...

All bird pictures I take with my Olympus SP-565UZ, ISO 64-100, optical zoom to the top.(made in Viet Nam) My wife going to Sarasota, Florida beach in the date of this post


.

Saturday, May 8, 2010

EDITORIAL: Watch out, Cuba is coming (Opinion about tourist industry in the caribbean)


"Not too many miles from Montego Bay, the tourism mecca which has been attracting visitors from across the globe, are communities saturated with gunmen who do not hesitate to turn their weapons on innocents, including infants. How long can Jamaica continue to keep this dirty little 'secret' hidden from potential visitors? And, if the country cannot protect its own citizens, how will it protect tourists? "

Published: Saturday

May 8, 2010 0 Comments and 0 Reactions
Industry watchers have been saying it for years. Cuba could become the number one tourist destination
in the Caribbean - as soon as the decades-old United States embargo is lifted.
Despite some softening, the US has not lifted sanctions but the news coming out of Havana indicates that 2009 was a bumper year for tourist arrivals. Last year, the Obama administration announced some easing of travel, monetary and telecommunications restrictions on our Spanish-speaking neighbour, and this has become a magnet for investors and visitors.
Lately, a conference staged by the Caribbean Hotel and Tourism Association heard how Cuba is riding a tourism
boom and listened to hopeful predictions for Cuba's tourism future. And even though Cuba lacks the infrastructure to accommodate a great influx at this time, Jamaica needs to start re-examining how we operate.
The efforts of Jamaica's tourism minister and his hard-working team represent virtually the only bright spot in an otherwise dismal economy. Recognising that tourism is truly one of the fastest growing industries, Ed Bartlett and his team have been working hard to get the country's share of the tourism pie. But Jamaica has every right to worry because even outside of the dread travel advisory being issued the soaring murder and mayhem in the Second City is threatening to derail those gains.

Mecca in danger
Not too many miles from Montego Bay, the tourism mecca which has been attracting visitors from across the globe, are communities saturated with gunmen who do not hesitate to turn their weapons on innocents, including infants. How long can Jamaica continue to keep this dirty little 'secret' hidden from potential visitors? And, if the country cannot protect its own citizens, how will it protect tourists?
There is a general notion that the escalating crime in St James is linked to the lottery scam which seeks to con unsuspecting people out of their money by advising them that they are winners in a sweepstake that require them to remit money in order to claim the winnings. But this scam is more than three years old and, apparently, we are no closer to finding the masterminds and punishing them. The sense of frustration, even disappointment, at the inability of the police to stem the bloodletting in the Second City was evident when stakeholders came together this week.
With new police leadership in St James, the way is clear for a fresh approach to crime- fighting. While recognising that the police must do their job in the least obtrusive manner, there needs to be a sustained multi-agency assault on these criminals. The fight must involve the police, the military, communities, civil society and the media, and the immediate task must be to capture the mastermind behind the spate of murders.
Loyal Jamaicans will always come home, if only for funerals, and the hardy traveller will continue to explore. However, it is conceivable that if our country continues to be associated with murder and mayhem tourists may shun the island. Right now, the image of Jamaica imprinted in many people's minds is that of a murderous, corrupt country that is teetering on the edge of disaster.

Friday, May 7, 2010

Begin to die the first turtles in Florida due to the suspected oil spill BP still killing marine life...

Oil spill could cause problems for sea turtles


Posted: May 07, 2010 4:25 PM EDT

Updated: May 07, 2010 6:07 PM EDT

COLLIER COUNTY: Southwest Florida is one of two places in the world where sea turtles lay their eggs. The animals face enough challenges surviving in the wild and this year, the oil could make things even worse. But one two-year-old turtle is overcoming the odds.
At just two-years-old, the female loggerhead we saw is a strong swimmer within the walls of her aquarium – the place she's called home for more than a year.
"Keeping her here and letting her grow keeps her from being eaten by many different things," said Troy Frensley of the Conservancy of Southwest Florida.
Now at around eight inches long, she's still not big enough to dive into open water - but she is ready for a larger tank.
With more room to swim and more food to eat, officials with the Conservancy say it will be more like home.
"We try to make it as natural as possible so she is going to know what she's going to do before she reaches the ocean," said Frensley.
The turtle will need to grow another 10 inches before being released back into the wild - a habitat where many turtles don't survive on their own.
In fact, over the past decade loggerhead turtle nesting has decreased from an all-time peak of 80,000 nests, to just 40,000 last year.
The battle begins before they even reach the shore.
"First of all, they have to be fit enough to make the trip, and they have to get around fishing gear, and plastic, and various types of garbage in the Gulf of Mexico," said Dave Addison, of the Conservancy.
They also have to avoid boats. Addison explained one turtle washed up just this week after colliding with one.
But this year, the animals face an even bigger challenge because they'll have to navigate through millions of gallons of oil that can coat their bodies and make the air toxic to breathe.
"This oil spill is certainly not good news for turtles or any other marine life," Addison said.
But for two-year-old turtle we met, her water is clean, her air is fresh and she's one aquarium closer to going home.
"It's always neat to take them out after they start out maybe a bit bigger than a silver dollar and turning them loose and let them make their way. That's where they're supposed to be," said Addison.
Once they're healthy enough to survive all the water throws at them.


See picture of the rescue and more...:
http://nwfdailynews.emeraldcoastphotoswest.com/mycapture/enlarge.asp?image=29341446&event=998040&CategoryID=26558&picnum=3&move=F&Slideshow=Stop#Image

Rescued loggerhead sea turtle dies
The Associated Press

DESTIN, Fla. -- A 250-pound loggerhead sea turtle that was rescued has died at a marine show aquarium in north Florida.
The turtle was found Wednesday by a local fisherman who said the turtle was unable to submerge in the water. It appeared to be in distress. The turtle was examined at the Emerald Coast Wildlife Refuge and then transferred to the Gulfarium for more treatment.
Gulfarium trainer Rachel Cain said the turtle died on Wednesday. A necropsy to determine the cause of death is set for Thursday.
Patrick Gault, the refuge's assistant director, says the
the turtle was unable to submerge in the water. It appeared to be in distress
Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/05/06/1616702/rescued-loggerhead-sea-turtle.html#ixzz0nI3TUKAr
 turtle didn't have any oil on it and, as far as he knows, the turtle's ailment was not related to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Information from: Northwest Florida Daily News, http://www.nwfdailynews.com
Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/05/06/1616702/rescued-loggerhead-sea-turtle.html#ixzz0nI3BraS9

UPDATE: Rescued sea turtle dies at Gulfarium (PHOTO GALLERY)Jeff Barker


2010-05-05 12:21:56

DESTIN — A 250-pound loggerhead sea turtle that was rescued Wednesday has died at Florida’s Gulfarium.
The turtle was found Wednesday by a local fisherman who said the turtle was unable to submerge in the water. It appeared to be in distress. The turtle was examined at the Emerald Coast Wildlife Refuge and then taken to the Gulfarium for more treatment.
Gulfarium trainer Rachel Cain said the turtle died later Wednesday. A necropsy to determine the cause of death was set for Thursday.

Patrick Gault, the refuge’s assistant director, said the turtle’s was not related to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

To see pictures of the turtle and rescue, please, click here:
http://www.nwfdailynews.com/common/printer/view.php?db=nwfdn&id=28679
Thursday, May 6 story:
DESTIN — A loggerhead sea turtle rescued Wednesday morning has been transferred to the Gulfarium.
The turtle was found by a local fisherman who said the turtle was unable to submerge in the water and appeared to be in distress. After an examination at Emerald Coast Wildlife Refuge, the 250-pound turtle was transferred to the Gulfarium for further treatment.
"We treated him for dehydration and when we transferred him he seemed stable," said Amanda Wilkerson, executive director of the refuge.
Wilkerson said the turtle will stay at Gulfarium for a couple weeks on antibiotics. The cause of the distress could have been a number of things including pneumonia.
The sea turtle was spotted by Joey Yerkes around 7 a.m. in the gulf near Destin’s Holiday Inn. He immediately called for help.
“I was going around trying to catch some bait when I saw this sea turtle on top of the water,” Yerkes said after the rescue. “He seemed to be struggling so I called FWC and tied him to my boat until they were able to come out.”
Click here to view photos of the turtle »
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Emerald Coast Wildlife Refuge were out in the water around 8:30 a.m. and brought the large turtle into the Coast Guard station.
“What we found was the sea turtle in distress,” said Emerald Coast Wildlife’s Patrick Gault. “It couldn’t (submerge) so we took it back to our facility and it’s waiting to be transferred.”
After loading the turtle on to Yerkes charter boat, he was transferred to shore where he was loaded up into a refuge vehicle.
“The rescue went really well,” Yerkes said. “Everybody acted quick — the turtle’s pretty lucky.”

NASA:gULF OF MEXICO OIL SPILL UPDATE SATELITE PICTURE.

Thursday, May 6, 2010

Cuba broken record as top Caribbean destination.

HAVANA, Cuba, Thursday May 6, 2010 – Cuba has broken its tourist arrival record and it’s coming after the title of top Caribbean destination.

Tourism Minister Manuel Marrero revealed that for the first four months this year, more than one million tourists visited the island’s shores – that’s twice the number recorded for the same period last year.
He said the 1,053,000 tourists who entered the country in the January to April 2010 period represents the “highest four-month period in the history of Cuban tourism”. And Marrero said Cuba could become the top tourist destination in the Caribbean in coming years.
The record tourist arrivals were accomplished despite a decline in the first two months of the year. Marrero credited his ministry’s marketing efforts for strong increases in March and April.
The largest source market in the four-month period was Canada, while there were increases in emigrants visiting from the United States and tourists coming from Latin American countries like Argentina, Colombia, Chile and Peru.
But it appears that Europeans are no bigger fans of Cuba as a tourism destination. According to Marrero, Spain is the only European country which has shown any growth.
Cuba has seen a steady increase in arrivals over the past few years, with a 3.5 percent rise in 2009 compared to the previous year.
With more people flying in, Marrero said several new hotel developments in major tourism areas are in the works.
“This, without any doubt, will allow the beginning of another phase in the development of Cuban tourism, with the entry of new segments and the execution of investments in zones with tourist potential that still have not been exploited,” the Tourism Minister said.

Wednesday, May 5, 2010

Newton, Sarasota, Florida: Third class citizen.?

Panel member Barbara Langston, a Newtown resident, supported the idea of a survey, because she believes most whites(IN SARASOTA, FLORIDA) feel that men in Newtown are all criminals and the all the women are illiterate.


The way affluent whites in Sarasota view black Newtown residents causes those in Newtown to commit crimes.

That was the basic hypothesis one of the Police Advisory Panel’s advisers offered to panel members April 26.

“If you feel you are devalued, how can you expect to achieve or obey the law?” asked Dr. James Unnever, a University of South Florida professor who specializes in police officers’ disparate treatment of minorities.


"YOUROBSERVER.COM"
 http://www.yourobserver.com/news/sarasota/Opinion/042920105931/Racism-fuels-Newtown-perception


'Racism fuels Newtown perception'

Date: April 29, 2010

by: Robin Roy
City Editor
The way affluent whites in Sarasota view black Newtown residents causes those in Newtown to commit crimes.
That was the basic hypothesis one of the Police Advisory Panel’s advisers offered to panel members April 26.
“If you feel you are devalued, how can you expect to achieve or obey the law?” asked Dr. James Unnever, a University of South Florida professor who specializes in police officers’ disparate treatment of minorities.
Unnever said studies show that if blacks, particularly black men, believe that whites think they are criminals, then they develop the attitude of, “Why should I follow the law?”
“If the prevailing attitude is that (Newtown is crime-ridden), the solution to the situation doesn’t reside in Newtown. It resides in white people,” he said.
To get a handle on how whites perceive Newtown residents, Unnever suggested the panel should recommend to city commissioners that a citywide survey be conducted to study those attitudes.
Unnever said, at the very least, the city’s black and Hispanic communities should have veto power over the police officers who are assigned to their neighborhoods.
Panel member Barbara Langston, a Newtown resident, supported the idea of a survey, because she believes most whites feel that men in Newtown are all criminals and the all the women are illiterate.
“Anyone who spends one hour in Newtown sees it’s not crime-ridden,” she said. “It’s one of the most friendliest places. The city needs to address its racism.”
Police department arrest figures show that in the past 12 months, there have been 6,317 criminal charges filed in police zones 2 and 3, which make up Newtown. That makes up more than 19% of the total criminal charges filed in the entire city, including 24% of the robberies, 43% of the armed robberies, 83% of the murders, 100% of the kidnappings.
Another panel adviser, though, shot down the idea of a survey.
With tongue in cheek, Ernie Scott said the police department should pull extra patrols out of Newtown and distribute officers evenly in every neighborhood, so there doesn’t appear to be any area that has more crime than another.
“Do you want to do that?” asked Scott. “It doesn’t make sense. The way affluent whites view Newtown is not the officers’ problem.”
BOX
The End is Near
The Police Advisory Panel has just three more bi-weekly meetings left in its six-month lifespan. Panel members will begin submitting their ideas to place in the final report, which will contain recommendations to improve the policies and procedures of the police department. The report will be presented to the City Commission for its consideration.
Contact Robin Roy at rroy@yourobserver.com.

Cornell Students Protest Nike's Treatment of Honduran Workers .Trabajadores hondurenos explotados.

TRABAJADORES HONDURENOS EXPLOTADOS CON SALARIOS DE MISERIA Y SIN NINGUN BENEFICIO Y SI PROTESTAN AHI ESTA LA POLICIA Y EL EJERCITO PARA CAERLES A PALOS, A GASES Y BALAS.ESO ES DEMOCRACIA EN HONDURAS BAJO EL GOLPE MILITAR.




"Just Pay it"

"Just Pay it"
That's the slogan that Cornell University students have punned as they try to force Nike to pay back-wages to a group of workers in Honduras. Student groups Cornell Organization for Labor Action and Cornell Students against Sweatshops say that Nike owes approximately 2.2 million dollars in back wages to about 17-hundred workers that were put out of work by shuttered factories. While Nike does not own the factories, the groups say that Nike is responsible for the fair treatment of its affiliate's workers.
To get Nike to respond, students are pushing Cornell University to sever all business ties with Nike. COLA and Students against sweatshops say that the treatment of Honduran workers has lead to a violation of the university's code of conduct and thus cannot do business with Cornell.
A Resolution and A Protest
Students today rallied at Ho Plaza to raise awareness and urge the university to sever ties with Nike until it adheres to Cornell's code of conduct and pays its workers fairly. Fil Eden, a Cornell Senior, told WVBR the rally went very well and that students from numerous groups made appearances
“Companies need to be held accountable for workers that produce their clothes,” Eden said.Eden also added that student groups have also sponsored and passed resolutions in Cornell's Student Assembly and University Assembly urging the university to cut ties with Nike.
Eden is cautiously optimistic about Cornell breaking off its Nike contracts.
“The University has a responsibility to do so, they can and should,” Eden told WVBR. “Whether or not they will is another question.”
Nike Responds
Nike told WVBR that “Nike is absolutely concerned for the workers in Honduras and we are deeply disappointed that the two failed sub-contract factories did not pay the workers their full severance pay. However, it remains Nike's position that factories which directly employ workers are responsible for ensuring that their employees receive their correct entitlements and as such Nike will not be paying severance to workers that were employed by Hugger and Vision Tex.”
Nike went further to say that it paid both companies off fully before their closure and is offering vocational job fairs for displaced workers.
The company also said it was updating its colligate factory policies to increase transparency and allow for more full disclosure. Nike noted that, with the exception of one occasion, the factories in question did not produce college apparel.
WVBR News - Monday, May 3, 2010

Sarasota County declares emergency-"HERALD TRIBUNE.COM"

BOX OF PANDORA IN THE GULF OF MEXICO.

                                  Photo taken with Olympus SP-565UZ(zoom) made in Viet Nam by Gualterio Nunez.
By Dale White


"As a precaution, the Sarasota County Commission declared a state of emergency Tuesday"

Link:http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20100505/ARTICLE/100509902?Title=As-precaution-Sarasota-County-declares-emergency

Monday, May 3, 2010

In Alaska, gulf spill brings back painful memories: "It just smell-yet-like a gas station"

In Alaska, gulf spill brings back painful memories



By DAN JOLING and MARK THIESSEN (AP) – 2 hours ago


CORDOVA, Alaska — Communities along the Gulf Coast wondering about what kind of legacy the monstrous oil slick will leave can look no further than the towns along the Alaska coastline that were ravaged by the Exxon Valdez spill in 1989.
Crude oil from the tanker still lingers on some beaches a full 21 years later. Some marine species never recovered. Families and bank accounts were shattered. Alcoholism, suicide and domestic violence rates all rose in hard-hit towns.
"As far as what's ahead, we have a feeling that we kind of know what those communities and individuals are going to go through, and it's absolutely tragic," said Stan Jones, spokesman for the Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council.
On March 23, 1989, the 987-foot supertanker left the port in Valdez loaded with 53 million gallons of North Slope crude from the trans-Alaska pipeline. The ship hit a reef three hours later, rupturing eight of its 11 cargo tanks and dumping 10.8 million gallons of crude into Prince William Sound.
About 1,300 miles of Alaska shoreline was affected by the spill, including 200 miles that were heavily contaminated, according to the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council. Responders found carcasses of more than 35,000 birds and 1,000 sea otters. That was considered to be a fraction of the bird and animal death toll because carcasses usually sink to the seabed. The council estimated 250,000 seabirds, 2,800 sea otters, 300 harbor seals, 250 bald eagles, up to 22 killer whales died along with billions of salmon and herring eggs.
Exxon said it spent $2.1 billion on a cleanup, but in a testament to the persistence of crude, oil a few inches below the surface remains on isolated beaches. Students on field trips to islands in Prince William Sound devastated by the spill often uncover rocks soiled in oil with little effort. An estimated 20,000 gallons of oil remain from the spill.
In Alaska, gulf spill brings back painful memories

By DAN JOLING and MARK THIESSEN (AP) – 2 hours ago
CORDOVA, Alaska — Communities along the Gulf Coast wondering about what kind of legacy the monstrous oil slick will leave can look no further than the towns along the Alaska coastline that were ravaged by the Exxon Valdez spill in 1989.
Crude oil from the tanker still lingers on some beaches a full 21 years later. Some marine species never recovered. Families and bank accounts were shattered. Alcoholism, suicide and domestic violence rates all rose in hard-hit towns.
"As far as what's ahead, we have a feeling that we kind of know what those communities and individuals are going to go through, and it's absolutely tragic," said Stan Jones, spokesman for the Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council.
On March 23, 1989, the 987-foot supertanker left the port in Valdez loaded with 53 million gallons of North Slope crude from the trans-Alaska pipeline. The ship hit a reef three hours later, rupturing eight of its 11 cargo tanks and dumping 10.8 million gallons of crude into Prince William Sound.
About 1,300 miles of Alaska shoreline was affected by the spill, including 200 miles that were heavily contaminated, according to the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council. Responders found carcasses of more than 35,000 birds and 1,000 sea otters. That was considered to be a fraction of the bird and animal death toll because carcasses usually sink to the seabed. The council estimated 250,000 seabirds, 2,800 sea otters, 300 harbor seals, 250 bald eagles, up to 22 killer whales died along with billions of salmon and herring eggs.
Exxon said it spent $2.1 billion on a cleanup, but in a testament to the persistence of crude, oil a few inches below the surface remains on isolated beaches. Students on field trips to islands in Prince William Sound devastated by the spill often uncover rocks soiled in oil with little effort. An estimated 20,000 gallons of oil remain from the spill.
"It just smells like a gas station," Kate Alexander of the Prince William Sound Science Center in Cordova said of the lingering remnants of the spill. "It's a very disturbing experience, but very real."
Alaskans also see uncomfortable parallels as BP takes heat for allegedly downplaying the initial threat of the spill in the Gulf of Mexico after a drilling rig exploded. A similar scenario unfolded in 1989 after the Valdez disaster.
"There were promises made that it was manageable, containable, that it could be cleaned up," said Jones, whose group is dedicated to preventing future oil spills. "It turned out the oil industry was just not capable of doing that. That seems to be what's happening in the gulf."
It is still too early to know what the lasting effects of the Gulf Coast spill will be. The well is spewing an estimated 200,000 gallons of oil a day and is on pace to quickly eclipse the Exxon Valdez spill as the worst oil disaster in U.S. history.
The environmental effects of the current spill will be different in some ways from what happened in Alaska. The warmer temperatures in the Gulf will help the oil degrade faster, and marsh and sand in Louisiana may react differently than Alaska's gravel and rock beaches.
But coastal towns no doubt will clearly feel the pain of a spill. The coastal communities in the Gulf of Mexico rely heavily on shrimp, oyster and other types of fishing just like Alaska towns rely on salmon and herring.
"I was watching the news the other day and I saw the fishermen in the gymnasium, and I went, "Yep, that was us, day three or four,'" said longtime Alaska fisherman RJ Kopchack. "I saw the guys filling out the paperwork to get their first claims processed, and I said, 'Yep, that was us, post spill, day five or six.'"
Exxon Valdez oil in recent years has shown up in sea otters and harlequin ducks. Some species never recovered. Though it was never definitively proven that killer whales were affected by the spill, "They dramatically lost abundance right during the spill and after the spill," said Craig Tillery, a member of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council who has worked on the spill since the week it happened.
Pacific herring, which spawned in heavily contaminated areas, were hard hit. Herring made a short comeback, but remain classified as "not recovering."
Jones' group commissioned studies to see how the spill affected people in small communities where fishing gives people their identity. Cordova was probably the most painful example because its fishing industry was hurt so much by the spill.
"The community exhibited every kind of social stress you can imagine," Jones said. "Alcoholism went up. Suicide went up. Family violence went up. Divorces went up. Of course, bankruptcies and various kinds of financial failures went up with the attendant stress on families."
Those who lived through the Valdez catastrophe said they felt enormous sorrow for the Gulf Coast because they know how painful it will all be, especially once the prolonged legal battles begin over compensation. The Valdez dispute was agonizingly slow and marked by several frustrating appeals.
Like many in the Alaska fishing business who feel burned after the U.S. Supreme Court slashed the jury award, Lynden O'Toole cautioned those on the Gulf Coast to not pin any hopes on a settlement.
"Don't sit around and wait for somebody, for the justice system, for instance, to come and rescue you because in our experience, that's not going to happen," said O'Toole, who had just gotten into the commercial fishing business when the spill happened.
"What's going to happen is they are going to end up exhausted," Kopchack added. "And eight or 10 years from now, they're still going to be fighting this."
Still, Alaska came away from the disaster with some valuable lessons. The state is much more prepared to deal with a future disaster because it has a huge response apparatus still in place. The system involves a flotilla of fishermen ready to go in the case of another disaster, including 350 vessels under contract ready to participate in a response.
"Some of them are under contract to be ready within six hours, out of port and deploying boom within six hours of the notice, and others come in within 24 hours, and then others are just kind of on a list to be called up as the oil gets farther and farther out of the sound," said Jones.
And Jones' group published a guide for how to cope with disasters like this. "It's not how to clean oiled birds," Jones said. "It's how to help the human beings that are in the way of one of these disasters."
Thiessen contributed to this report from Cordova.
Kate Alexander of the Prince William Sound Science Center in Cordova said of the lingering remnants of the spill. "It's a very disturbing experience, but very real."
Alaskans also see uncomfortable parallels as BP takes heat for allegedly downplaying the initial threat of the spill in the Gulf of Mexico after a drilling rig exploded. A similar scenario unfolded in 1989 after the Valdez disaster.
"There were promises made that it was manageable, containable, that it could be cleaned up," said Jones, whose group is dedicated to preventing future oil spills. "It turned out the oil industry was just not capable of doing that. That seems to be what's happening in the gulf."
It is still too early to know what the lasting effects of the Gulf Coast spill will be. The well is spewing an estimated 200,000 gallons of oil a day and is on pace to quickly eclipse the Exxon Valdez spill as the worst oil disaster in U.S. history.
The environmental effects of the current spill will be different in some ways from what happened in Alaska. The warmer temperatures in the Gulf will help the oil degrade faster, and marsh and sand in Louisiana may react differently than Alaska's gravel and rock beaches.
But coastal towns no doubt will clearly feel the pain of a spill. The coastal communities in the Gulf of Mexico rely heavily on shrimp, oyster and other types of fishing just like Alaska towns rely on salmon and herring.
"I was watching the news the other day and I saw the fishermen in the gymnasium, and I went, "Yep, that was us, day three or four,'" said longtime Alaska fisherman RJ Kopchack. "I saw the guys filling out the paperwork to get their first claims processed, and I said, 'Yep, that was us, post spill, day five or six.'"
Exxon Valdez oil in recent years has shown up in sea otters and harlequin ducks. Some species never recovered. Though it was never definitively proven that killer whales were affected by the spill, "They dramatically lost abundance right during the spill and after the spill," said Craig Tillery, a member of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council who has worked on the spill since the week it happened.
Pacific herring, which spawned in heavily contaminated areas, were hard hit. Herring made a short comeback, but remain classified as "not recovering."
Jones' group commissioned studies to see how the spill affected people in small communities where fishing gives people their identity. Cordova was probably the most painful example because its fishing industry was hurt so much by the spill.
"The community exhibited every kind of social stress you can imagine," Jones said. "Alcoholism went up. Suicide went up. Family violence went up. Divorces went up. Of course, bankruptcies and various kinds of financial failures went up with the attendant stress on families."
Those who lived through the Valdez catastrophe said they felt enormous sorrow for the Gulf Coast because they know how painful it will all be, especially once the prolonged legal battles begin over compensation. The Valdez dispute was agonizingly slow and marked by several frustrating appeals.
Like many in the Alaska fishing business who feel burned after the U.S. Supreme Court slashed the jury award, Lynden O'Toole cautioned those on the Gulf Coast to not pin any hopes on a settlement.
"Don't sit around and wait for somebody, for the justice system, for instance, to come and rescue you because in our experience, that's not going to happen," said O'Toole, who had just gotten into the commercial fishing business when the spill happened.
"What's going to happen is they are going to end up exhausted," Kopchack added. "And eight or 10 years from now, they're still going to be fighting this."
Still, Alaska came away from the disaster with some valuable lessons. The state is much more prepared to deal with a future disaster because it has a huge response apparatus still in place. The system involves a flotilla of fishermen ready to go in the case of another disaster, including 350 vessels under contract ready to participate in a response.
"Some of them are under contract to be ready within six hours, out of port and deploying boom within six hours of the notice, and others come in within 24 hours, and then others are just kind of on a list to be called up as the oil gets farther and farther out of the sound," said Jones.
And Jones' group published a guide for how to cope with disasters like this. "It's not how to clean oiled birds," Jones said. "It's how to help the human beings that are in the way of one of these disasters."
Thiessen contributed to this report from Cordova.

Drilling may be needed,but..."It can't be done at the risk of having to spend billions of dollars cleaning up these spills."


"There is no such thing as overregulation of this industry. Offshore drilling carries real dangers. It must be tightly regulated."

"The big lie -- after the Exxon Valdez disaster was blamed on a drunken captain -- is that everything is safer now, that new technologies make (big spills) impossible: It's out and out industry propaganda,"


http://www.seattlepi.com/connelly/419308_joel03.html

Lessons from the Gulf oil spill
Last updated May 2, 2010 1:27 p.m. PT
By JOEL CONNELLY
SEATTLEPI.COM STAFF


The crowd in New Orleans cheered last month as Sarah Palin, in a reprise of her 2008 vice presidential bid, defined energy policy as: "Lets 'Drill Baby Drill', not 'Stall Baby Stall'."


The huzzahs stopped when 210,000 gallons of oil a day began leaking into the Gulf of Mexico, after explosion of the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform, and washed toward coastal estuaries that sustain a billion-dollar commercial and sport fishery, and shrimp harvest.


"They were saying this couldn't happen, and it happened," said former Louisiana Sen. J. Bennett Johnson, a longtime friend of Big Oil.


As the Obama administration worked to stem the damage, Rush Limbaugh was on the air blaming the lethal blast and leak on "environmental whackos" who want to "head off more drilling."


But this disaster needs to drill a fundamental truth into the heads of Americans.


Don't trust Big Oil, and don't let it set America's agenda. Our country cannot sacrifice its economy, climate, fisheries, air and water quality at the altar of the carbon economy.

"We are looking at a wildlife disaster that is unthinkable: This could be the Exxon Valdez on steroids," historian Douglas Brinkley, author of The Great Deluge: Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans and the Mississippi Gulf Coast, said in an interview.

Brinkley has seen those TV ads in which British Petroleum -- owner of the lease site -- claims its initials stand for "Beyond Petroleum."


"We've got to stop listening to the oil companies' fake environmental rhetoric," Brinkley said. "There is no such thing as overregulation of this industry. Offshore drilling carries real dangers. It must be tightly regulated."


The Deepwater Horizon disaster is a teaching moment. We, in the Northwest and Alaska, need to be learners.


Exploratory drilling in the Chukchi Sea off Alaska is scheduled to begin in 59 days, in a harsh and icy Arctic environment. Will the Obama administration hold off, or adopt Palin's attitude to go-for-it even if, in her words, a wild creature has to "take one for the team"?


A few years back, British Petroleum wanted to virtually double the size of its refinery dock at Cherry Point, north of Bellingham, to accommodate more tankers. The dock expansion was to take place in front of our inland waters' premier herring spawning grounds.


Republican rulers in the U.S. House of Representatives included a provision deleting all safety restrictions on tankers in Puget Sound in legislation to encourage more refineries. Reps. Jay Inslee, D-Wash., and Dave Reichert, R-Wash., raised hell and had the language deleted.


Sen. Ted Stevens, R-Alaska, the oil industry's great and good friend, introduced a bill to repeal the 1977 law that limited the number and size of tankers serving Puget Sound refineries. Sen. Maria Cantwell stopped him with the threat of a filibuster.


This April, the Obama administration opened vast new areas off the Atlantic Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico to oil leasing. It put off-limits Alaska's Bristol Bay, but signaled a go-ahead for the Chukchi Sea and Beaufort Sea.


Even this didn't satisfy Big Oil's strumpets on Capitol Hill.


"Keeping the Pacific Coast and Alaska, as well as the most promising resources of the Gulf of Mexico, under lock and key makes no sense at a time when gasoline prices are rising," said House Republican leader John Boehner.


Big Oil has given us several -- painful -- teaching moments.


The 1969 Union Oil "blowout" in a Santa Barbara Channel drill rig was an impetus to the first Earth Day, and coastline protections that people like Rep. Boehner would overturn.


"I don't like to call it a disaster, because there has been no loss of human life: I am amazed at the publicity for loss of a few birds," said Union Oil president Fred Hartley. Actually, it was 10,000 birds.


The quip caused a public uproar. The industry gussied up its PR and promised that the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, with tanker traffic out of Prince William Sound, would do no harm.


"Wernher von Braun, you know the spaceman, assured me that all the technology of the space program will be put into the doggone tankers and there will not be one drop of oil in Prince William Sound," Sen. Stevens told a skeptical Cordova fisherman.


The 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster has receded into history. More recently, corroded BP pipes and leaks of oil onto the tundra at Prudhoe Bay, drew a hefty federal fine but coverage.


"The big lie -- after the Exxon Valdez disaster was blamed on a drunken captain -- is that everything is safer now, that new technologies make (big spills) impossible: It's out and out industry propaganda," Brinkley said.


Last week, about 200 people gathered in Seattle for a photo display by Florian Schulz, a young German photographer who has been shooting in the Arctic for an IMAX project and an upcoming book by Braided River.


The screen filled with polar bears and cubs on ice flows of the Chukchi Sea, bird life on Teshekpuk Lake in the National Petroleum Reserve, and vast caribou herds in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.


"Everybody has seen what is happening in the Gulf, but the oil companies are saying this can be done safely and without harm," Shultz noted. "They have told us they can switch it off at the push of a button."


Sure! In future dealing with Big Oil, there comes to mind the famous Ronald Reagan haiku for arms deals with the Soviets: Trust, but verify.


Drilling may be needed, but as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said last week: "It can't be done at the risk of having to spend billions of dollars cleaning up these spills." The damage endures long after that.

Joel Connelly can be reached at 206-448-8160 or joelconnelly@seattlepi.com. Follow Joel on Twitter at twitter.com/joelconnelly.
© 1998-2010 Seattle Post-Intelligencer

Sunday, May 2, 2010

OilSpillVolunteers.com (http://www.oilspillvolunteers.com/index.php)

This web site provides a place for people to volunteer to assist in cleanup operations related to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Organizations working on the cleanup may register here to be connected with volunteers. OilSpillVolunteers.com will link volunteers with cleanup organizations; we will not be directing volunteer activities.

OSHA, BP, Transocean, Homeland Security, USCG, NOAA, EPA, Department of the Interior - We need to hear from you. We have 4300+ people eager to be trained and eager to jump into action when the oil comes ashore. How do they get training? What can they do to help with the cleanup? We have volunteers with prior oil spill cleanup experience, certifications, and commercial boats who are eager to go to work. How can we communicate with the right people to put them to work? The public toll-free numbers aren't working for such things.
Volunteers - Please register using this form. Provide complete as much of the form as possible and indicate whether your contact information can be shared directly with cleanup organizations. Please do not use email to provide your volunteer information. Note that OSHA regs require special training for anyone involved in oil cleanup or oiled-wildlife rehab. BP has contracted with Tri-State to do the cleanup and wildlife rehab. BP will not train volunteers. We are still trying to determine what other work can be done by volunteers.
Volunteers not on the Gulf Coast - At this time we have enough local volunteers to handle the opportunities that have been identified. Please save your travel resources for now.
Caution: Do not attempt oil cleanup work without training and the required safety equipment. The oil waste is a toxic material and can pose a threat. This OSHA handbook for oil spill cleanup will explain. OSHA regulations require that oil spill cleanup personnel have HAZWOPER (Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response) certification. Read about the issue of training and oil cleanup here.
Cleanup Organizations Needing Volunteers - Please send email to don@OilSpillVolunteers.com describing your needs and activities. (Please route all individual volunteer offers to the registration form here on the web. We are receiving a large number of emails and calls and it's much simpler and more reliable to keep track of volunteers in the database linked to the form. We'd hate to misplace an email and lose contact with you.)
Boat owners - If your boat is capable of handling booms and other spill management and cleanup equipment, you may contact BP's Vessels of Opportunity program at 281.366.5511. Participation under this program would be compensated by BP. (Commercial fishing boats and similar craft, not appropriate for small recreational boats.)
If you have HAZWOPER certifications or wildlife rehabilitiation certification, you may be eligible to work in a paid capacity with BP's contractor Tri-State. Please send an email to certified@oilspillvolunteers.com with your contact information and certification details. We'll forward the information to BP. (HAZWOPER - Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response)
If you've signed up and had a question - Please be patient, we'll be in touch as soon as possible.
Forecast location of the spill at 0600 CDT on Sunday 5/2/2010 (prepared 1330 on 4/30/10). The red color shows where oil will reach the shore. The Chandeleur Islands and Louisiana marshes will be affected. For additional higher detail plots, see the sites listed on the links page.

Gulf oil spill news updated.





Party in the cubans street one day before ! of May celebration.

First of May in Cuba

Saturday, May 1, 2010

Mote Marine Lab web pages for Florida beaches.(LIve report)

http://coolgate.mote.org/beachconditions/
Environmental Updates


On any given day, Mote's 200-plus researchers are in the field collecting information or asking for public help gathering information for important marine research studies. These Environmental Updates change regularly, reflecting Florida's ever-changing environment. Mote invites you to visit regularly for new information.



Beach Conditions Report

Red Tide

Sawfish Sighting

Florida Keys Environmental Observations

Sea Turtle Nesting



Marine Mammal & Sea Turtle Strandings

Weather

Ginger the dolphin's release!



Tracking Rehabilitated and Released Risso's Dolphins



Dolphin Friendly Fishing and Viewing Tips





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Beach Conditions Report



The Beach Conditions Report provides several types of information about Southwest Florida beaches during red tide events: whether dead fish are present, whether there is respiratory irritation among beachgoers, what the water color is, the wind direction and what flags are currently flying at the beaches (for lifeguard-monitored beaches).



The Beach Conditions ReportTM covers 31 beaches in nine Florida counties:

• Escambia County: Pensacola Beach

• Okaloosa County: Fort Walton Beach, Henderson Beach State Park and Destin Beach

• Gulf County: St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, both Gulfside and Bayside

• Franklin County: St. George Island State Park , both Bayside and Gulfside

• Pinellas County: Caladesi Island State Park, Fort DeSoto Park

• Manatee County: Manatee Beach, Coquina Beach

• Sarasota County: Lido Key, Siesta Key, Nokomis, Venice North Jetty, Venice Beach, Manasota Beach

• Lee County: Bowditch Point Park, Lynn Hall Beach Park, Lovers Key State Park, Bonita Beach, Tarpon Bay Beach, Lighthouse Point on Sanibel Island

• Collier County: Barefoot Beach, Vanderbilt Beach, Seagate Beach, Lowdermilk Park, Naples Pier, Tigertail Beach, South Marco Beach







The information is provided from a number of different sources, including lifeguards, park rangers and other trained observers. They're able to report the information directly to the web from the beaches thanks to Mote’s Sarasota Operations Coastal Ocean Observation Laboratory (SO COOL), which has created software that automatically posts the updates online.



Residents and visitors without Internet access may also ac

Streetlight and darkness of the house.

Inappropriées et des déclarations déplaisantes sur Cuba de "l'ambassadeur américain" au Mexique, HE monsier Carlos Pascual
US ambassador to Mexico declared: "Climate change will sink Cuba"
(He is a "guru" of the future of Cuba but why does the United States ambassador in Washington does not issued statements to the press that alerted of the danger to Florida of oil spill, now, in the Gulf of Mexico, if he is considered an "expert in environment" that can see next 50 years in the future of an island 90 milles away from Key West?)



The US Ambassador to Mexico SE Carlos Pascual expert in climate change and renewable energy

By Igor I. Solar.
Mexico - "The political problems between Cuba and the United States will be resolved in 50 years when the island disappears under water because of climate change", said Carlos Pascual, the U.S. ambassador in Mexico City.
Mexique - Les problèmes politiques entre Cuba et les États-Unis seront résolus en 50 ans Quand l'île disparaît sous l'eau En raison du changement climatique, a déclaré Carlos Pascual, les États-Unis ambassadeur à Mexico.

Mexico - The political problems between Cuba and the United States will be resolved in 50 years when the island disappears under water because of climate change, said Carlos Pascual, the U.S. ambassador in Mexico City.

Mr. Pascual, born in Havana in 1959, was introduced as an “expert in climate change and renewable energy” at a Forum called Green Business Expo held at a private university in Mexico City. In his talk he referred to the effect of global warming and rising sea levels in areas such as Florida and Cuba, according to CNN [Spanish language].