Saturday, September 5, 2009

Food, inflation, price, economy crisis and climatic change in the caribbean.

A global assessment of the potential impact of climate change on world food supply suggests that doubling of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration will lead to only a small decrease in global crop production. But developing countries are likely to bear the brunt of the problem, and simulations of the effect of adaptive measures by farmers imply that these will do little to reduce the disparity between developed and developing countries.(From "Potential impact of climate change on world food supply"
Cynthia Rosenzweig* & Martin L. Parry†
*Columbia University and Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, New York 10025, USA†Environmental Change Unit, Oxford University, la Mansfield Road, Oxford 0X1 STB, UK)

GENEVA, Sep 3 (IPS) - A group of 125 non-governmental organisations from 50 countries is calling on the governments participating in the mini-ministerial trade talks in India over the next two days to reject the further liberalisation of food and rather promote policies that will achieve food security and rural development and safeguard farmers’ livelihoods.The organisations, of which 13 are in Africa, argue in a letter to the 36 countries attending the mini-ministerial meeting that the World Trade Organisation’s (WTO) policies have resulted in "a failed global agricultural system including extremely volatile commodities markets, a lack of global access to nutritious and affordable food, an increase in hunger, and the erosion of farmers’ incomes. "These policies have culminated in the global food crisis we face today, where about 30,000 people die every day of poverty related causes, many due to malnutrition and hunger. The FAO (Food and Agriculture Organisation) estimates that over one billion people are now going hungry, with about 150 million more people experiencing hunger as a result of the current food crisis," expound the organisations.
Link:http://www.ipsnews.net/africa/nota.asp?idnews=48308


New ways for the integrated appraisal of national energy scenarios: The case of renewable energy use in Austria

References and further reading may be available for this article. To view references and further reading you must purchase this article.
Reinhard Madlenera, , , Katharina Kowalskib and Sigrid Staglb
aRWTH Aachen University, Faculty of Business and Economics/E.ON Energy Research Center, Institute for Future Energy Consumer Needs and Behavior, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen, Germany


Editorial:
A main strategy on local policies on energy saving, agriculture and fisheries to lowering importation and not to pay unuseful or obsoleted technologist, in 2010, will decide the future of currency and credit in the international market of the developing countries of the Caribbean area facing to the increasingly economic crisis in United States and the dollar inflation in the midled of a climate change unpredictable. Analysts foresee an increase from 2.5 to 5.5% in global food prices but poor countries will pay much more...

To do otherwise is to fall into extreme poverty(1), incur more debt with a Foreign Powers and sell the national patrimony as happened to Menem's Argentina.
Gualterio Nunez Estrada, Sarasota, Florida, 34,233. (1)"When crop yield results are introduced to the BLS world food trade system model, the combined model and scenario experiments demonstrate that the world, for the most part, appears to be able to continue to feed itself under the SRES scenarios during the rest of this century. However, this outcome is achieved through production in the developed countries (which mostly benefit from climate change) compensating for declines projected, for the most part, for developing nations. While global production appears stable, regional differences in crop production are likely to grow stronger through time, leading to a significant polarisation of effects, with substantial increases in prices and risk of hunger amongst the poorer nations, especially under scenarios of greater inequality (A1FI and A2)."Effects of climate change on global food production under SRES emissions and socio-economic scenarios (From:References and further reading may be available for this article. To view references and further reading you must purchase this article.
M. L. Parry
, , a, C. Rosenzweigb, A. Iglesiasc, M. Livermored and G. Fischere
a Hadley Centre, UK Meteorological Office, Fitzroy Road, Exeter EX1 3PB, UK
b Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York City, USA
c Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain
d Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia, UK
e International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria
Available online 9 January 2004
. )

Link:http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6VFV-4BDY65D-1&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1001940146&_rerunOrigin=scholar.google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=96c7048efd8a976c6e2aa11929923c5
The UN World Food Program reported that unit food costs had risen by 50% in five years, with maize costs up 120% over the year to June 2007. The UN FAO estimated that the cost of imported food in 2008 was US$ 1.04 trillion, 26% up on 2007. A FAO / OECD report predicts food price increases of between 20% and 50% over the next ten years, due to reduced subsidies, greater demand for protein, higher production costs and the demand for biofuels. According to the UN FAO the price of dairy products rose 80% and grain 42% during 2007.
GB9403729

Link:http://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/NewsArchive/artikel.php?ID=167984
*
Titles Climate change and world food supply
Personal Authors Rosenzweig, C.; Parry, M.L.; Gischer, G.; Frohberg, K. (Columbia University. Goddard Institute for Space Studies)
Publisher Oxford Univ.
Publisher Place Oxford (United Kingdom)
Publication Date 1993
AGRIS Subj. Cat. Agricultural economics and policies;Meteorology and climatology
AGROVOC Terms CLIMATIC CHANGE, MODELS, FOOD SUPPLY, PRICES, FOODS, FAMINE/ DEVELOPING COUNTRIES, WORLD, VARIATION DU CLIMAT, MODELE, DISPONIBILITE ALIMENTAIRE, PRIX, PRODUIT ALIMENTAIRE, FAMINE/ PAYS EN DEVELOPPEMENT, MONDE, CAMBIO CLIMATICO, MODELOS, SUMINISTRO DE ALIMENTOS, PRECIOS, ALIMENTOS, ESCASEZ DE ALIMENTOS/ PAISES EN DESARROLLO, MUNDO
Other subjects CLIMATE, ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY, SUPPLY, SUPPLY BALANCE, CLIMAT, GEOGRAPHIE ECONOMIQUE, OFFRE, OFFRE ET DEMANDE, CLIMA, GEOGRAFIA ECONOMICA, OFERTA, OFERTA Y DEMANDA
Language En
Notes 47 ref., 11 fig., 17 tab., 3 app.
Collation 31 p.
Availability DEFRA (United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland)
Availability number 9403729
Serial Title Research Report - Environmental Change Unit, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Serial number no. 3


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Climate change scenarios(Ref.:http://www.ciesin.org/docs/004-046/004-046.html
Rosenzweig, C., M. L. Parry, G. Fischer, and K. Frohberg. 1993. Climate change and world food supply. Research Report No. 3. Oxford: University of Oxford, Environmental Change Unit.
Nature 367, 133 - 138 (13 January 1994); doi:10.1038/367133a0



Potential impact of climate change on world food supply


Cynthia Rosenzweig* & Martin L. Parry†


*Columbia University and Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, New York 10025, USA
†Environmental Change Unit, Oxford University, la Mansfield Road, Oxford 0X1 STB, UK





A global assessment of the potential impact of climate change on world food supply suggests that doubling of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration will lead to only a small decrease in global crop production. But developing countries are likely to bear the brunt of the problem, and simulations of the effect of adaptive measures by farmers imply that these will do little to reduce the disparity between developed and developing countries.



References 1. Parry, M. L., Carter, T. R. & Konijn, N. T. (eds) The Impact of Climatic Variations on Agriculture Vols 1 & (Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1988).
2. Adams, R. M. et al. Nature 345, 219−224 (1990). Article
3. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Climate Change: The IPCC Impacts Assessment (eds Tegart, W. J. McG., Sheldon, G. W. & Griffiths, D.C.) (Aust. Govt Publishing Serv., Canberra, 1990).
4. Kane, S., Reilly, J. & Tobey, J. Report AER-No. 647 (US Dept of Agric. Econ, Res. Serv., Washington DC, 1991).
5. Reilly, J. & Hohmann, N. Am. econ. Ass. Pap. Proc. 83, 306−312 (1993).
6. Rosenzweig, C. & Iglesias, A. (eds) Implications of Climate Change for International Agriculture: Crop Modeling Study (US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, in the press).
7. Climate Change: The IPCC Scientific Assessment (eds Houghton, J. T., Jenkins, G. J. & Ephraums, J. J.) (Cambridge Univ. Press, 1990).
8. IPCC Climate Change 1992 (eds Houghton, J. T., Callander, B. A. & Varney, S. K.) (Cambridge Univ. Press, 1992).
9. Acock, B. & Allen, L. H. Jr in Direct Effects of Increasing Carbon Dioxide on Vegetation (eds Strain, B. R. & Cure, J. D.) 33−97 (US Dept. of Energy DOE/ER-0238, Washington DC, 1985).
10. Cure, J. D. & Acock, B. Agric. For. Met. 38, 127−145 (1986).
11. Hansen, J., J. geophys. Res. 93, 9341−9364 (1988). ChemPort
12. International Benchmark Sites Network for Agrotechnology Transfer (IBSNAT) Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer Version 2.1 (DSSAT V2.1) (Dept Agron. & Soil Sci., Coll. Trap. Agric. & Hum. Resources, Univ. Hawaii, Honolulu, 1989).
13. Peart, R. M., Jones, J. W., Curry, R. B., Boote, K. & Allen, L. H. Jr. in The Potential Effects of Global Climate Change on the United States. Appendix C Vol. 1 (eds Smith, J. B. & Tirpak, D. A.) (US Envir. Protection Ag., Washington DC, 1989).
14. Rogers, H. H., Bingham, G. E., Cure, J. D., Smith, J. M. & Surano, K. A. J. envir. Qual. 12, 569−574 (1983). ChemPort
15. Fischer, G., Frohberg, K., Keyzer, M. A. & Parikh, K. S. Linked National Models: A Tool for International Food Policy Analysis (Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1988).
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17. United Nations World Population Prospects 1988 (UN, New York, 1989).
18. International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/World Bank World Population Projections (Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, Baltimore, 1990).
19. AGROSTAT/PC (Food and Agricultural Organization, United Nations, Rome, 1991).
20. Hansen, J. et al. Mon. Weath. Rev. 111(4), 609−662 (1983). Article ISI
21. Manabe, S. & Wetherald, R. T. J. atmos. Sci. 44, 1211−1235 (1987). Article
22. Wilson, C. A. & Mitchell, J. F. B. J. geophys. Res. 92(13), 315−343 (1987).





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