Saturday, July 18, 2009

American who travelled to Cuba sued the Treasury Department.

CROSS OVER OF CULTURES AND SIGNS OF CIVILIZATION, ALMOST FIFTY YEARS AFTER OF EMBARGO ARE MORE STRONGER BETWEEN CUBA AND UNITED STATES.
I pay, recently, for a flight ticket in Airstrans 96 dollars roundtrip Sarasota, Florida-Atlanta that are five hundred miles plus five hundred more back, the flight to Cuba are ninety miles plus ninety miles back and cost more than five hundred dollars if you fly directly, plus penalties and fees in both customs.
Currently, if you're a Cuban-American who is going to Cuba to visit family and friends on the island have to pay for ninety miles to fly as a passenger in a weekend in London with hotel, breakfast and dinner included. Even have to pay pounds baggage in Cuba and in Miami too, and other penalties and more, fee for gifts to the family at the airport in Cuba, so the trip to Cuba in tension beyond the film "Indiana Jones" in many cases and requires that you save over a year to cope with the costs of airfare, airport and customs, plus fines and penalties of Customs in Cuba that are always unpredictable. Americans traveling to Cuba, pay the duck much more, at only ninety miles from United States to Cuba, it is easier to visit North Korea than to travel to Cuba, can not fly direct, they are forced to travel through Canada and other countries pay much more for the passage so that two or three hundred dollars more you have the money for a round trip to Japan. Now I see the news that the Treasury Department has been sued in court by an American who traveled to Cuba and was fined $ 1000 for his boldness, let's see here:(Gualterio Nunez Estrada, Sarasota, Florida, 34233)
(Updates with Treasury spokeswoman declining to comment in last paragraph.)
By Chad Bray Of DOW JONES NEWSWIRES
NEW YORK (Dow Jones)--A New York man filed a lawsuit Thursday challenging the U.S. government's restrictions on spending by American citizens and permanent residents while traveling to Cuba.
The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn, alleges Zachary Sanders was fined after he failed to respond to a March 2000 request by the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control for information on an alleged June 1998 trip to Cuba and travel while he was there.
The complaint claims that people who respond to OFAC's request open themselves up for potential criminal sanctions.
"The penalty imposed against Mr. Sanders is unlawful because the Fifth Amendment prohibits the government from punishing failure to obey any regulation that requires a self-incriminating act," the lawsuit said.
An administrative law judge recommended Sanders be fined $1,000 in 2008, according to the lawsuit. OFAC had proposed a fine as large as $10,000.
OFAC appealed the judge's ruling and a designee for then-Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson affirmed the penalty and increased it to $9,000 on Jan. 16, the Bush administration's last day in office, according to the lawsuit.
The complaint, filed on behalf of Sanders by the nonprofit Center for Constitutional Rights, is seeking a declaration that OFAC's policy is unlawful, enjoining OFAC from issuing such penalties and setting aside the fine to Sanders.
The lawsuit names Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner as a defendant.
A Treasury spokeswoman declined to comment Thursday, saying Treasury policy is to not comment on pending litigation.
-By Chad Bray, Dow Jones Newswires; 212-227-2017; chad.bray@dowjones.com

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